Viewing entries tagged
dogs

All Dogs and Cats Need Routine Veterinary Care

Comment

All Dogs and Cats Need Routine Veterinary Care

You should select a "family" veterinarian who is familiar with the species you have chosen. Your local veterinary associations, friends, and neighbors, or the yellow pages can help you find the right veterinarian for you and your animals. You may have to speak with several veterinarians before you find the right one for your circumstances. Staying with one veterinary group allows them to get to know you and your animal and provides continuity of care for your animals.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING A VISIT TO THE VETERINARIAN

Physical examination

Animals do not always let us know when something is wrong until the disease is quite advanced. Many species provide only subtle signs of disease. Some of these problems can be detected early through annual examinations or more frequent examinations if any problems are seen by a caretaker. This visit is also your chance to ask any questions about your animal's health, nutrition, flea control, behavior, etc. One area often overlooked by caretakers is dental care of their animals. Dogs and cats benefit from having their teeth brushed and can develop severe dental disease before you are aware of the problem. Your veterinarian may recommend a dental cleaning with polishing or a plan for home cleaning. Your veterinarian can also tell you if your animal is overweight. Each visit to the veterinarian provides a record of your pet’s weight that can be used to see if your pet seems to be gaining or losing weight. He/she can offer suggestions on optimal feeding or how to get your animal to lose weight.

Vaccinations

Periodic vaccinations are important for all dogs and cats to help prevent disease. Vaccinations are especially important in puppies and kittens that are not fully able to protect themselves from serious diseases, with the specific schedule generally starting at 6-8 weeks of age and continuing until the pet is 12-16 weeks of age. These diseases can be fatal but are infrequently seen because of the widespread use of effective vaccines. Just because you have never seen these diseases does not mean you do not need to vaccinate your dog or cat because some of them can survive in the environment for long periods, waiting to be picked up by an unprotected animal. Clinics are available to provide vaccinations without examination but annual examinations are still recommended even if you choose to obtain vaccinations elsewhere.
If your veterinarian feels that your dog or cat has a problem that would be best handled by a veterinarian who specializes in that field, he/she may refer you to a specialist in cardiology, behavior, surgery, internal medicine, etc.  In case of emergency, some veterinarian will take these calls or may refer you to an emergency clinic that can provide care during hours most clinics are not staffed. If you see anything out of the ordinary (such as changes in appetite, water intake, urination, or significant change in behavior) or any obvious injury or illness, call your veterinary hospital to see if they feel an examination is needed.

Routine home check-up

You should check your pets’ body daily for lumps, cuts, swelling, or any other changes. Your veterinarian may find abnormalities that you miss, but generally animals have their veterinary physicals only once a year.Animals can't describe their difficulties, so it is important to be alert and spot problems early, and seek veterinary attention when needed.
Important Reminder:  An annual examination is always needed for the general health and maintenance of your pet. Just because your pet does not seem ill does not mean you should skip his/her annual checkup. Your veterinarian can spot problems before it’s too late.  A thorough examination would include listening to the heart, checking the teeth, ears, eyes, stomach, kidneys, liver, etc.

Remember, they can’t tell you how they feel until it’s too late so it’s up to you to take care of them.

Comment

Pet Fire Safety

Comment

Pet Fire Safety

Half a million pets are affected by home fires every year; establishing a pet-friendly fire escape plan can save your pet’s life.

How to Keep Pets Safe at Home

Since not all fires can be prevented, a little advanced thought and preparation is a good idea. From including your pets in your family’s disaster and emergency evacuation plans to helping to equip your local fire department with pet-specific oxygen masks, there are some important steps you can take to improve your pet’s chances of survival in the unfortunate event that a fire strikes your home.

  • Take an afternoon and draw up a disaster preparedness plan for your family. Be sure to include the non-human members of your crew, as well. Conduct annual “dry runs” of your evacuation plan with your family.
  • Have plenty of smoke detectors throughout your house, ensuring that you’ve got at least one on each level. Test them and replace the batteries regularly.
  • Put “Pet Alert” stickers on the inside of your front door windows so that firefighters and other first-responders will know that there may be animals inside that may need saving.
  • If you’re like most people, and spend a lot of time outside of your home, consider having monitored fire and smoke detectors installed throughout your home. This way, the fire department will know to respond even if you and your neighbors aren’t home.
  • Keep a leash, carrier, or even a spare pillowcase near where your pets sleep. These can help you control them and lead them to safety in the event that an evacuation needs to happen in the middle of the night.
  • Contact your local fire department and ask if they have pet-specific oxygen masks. If they do, great – thank them. If not though, help them raise the funds to get some. This can be a great school or scout project for your kids to initiate. Or collaborate with your veterinarian and/or pet supply store to create a local fundraising drive.

Comment

The Yellow Dog Project is Gaining Ground!

Comment

The Yellow Dog Project is Gaining Ground!

If you see a dog with a YELLOW RIBBON or something yellow on the leash, this is a dog who needs some space. Please do not approach this dog with your dog. Give him distance or time to move out of your way.
The Global Yellow Dog Project is working to educate the public about approaching dogs who are fearful of other animals or people, recovering from surgery (or in pain due to a medical condition) or companions "in training," who may not have nailed down their manners just yet. The project encourages pet parents to tie a yellow ribbon to their dog's leash to identify those who need to be approached with extra care.They hope that this universal sign will help give trepidatious dogs the space they need. The project is gaining ground, but it's success hinges on sharing the yellow ribbon's meaning - so spread the word.


Comment

Comment

Little Shelter Joins Maddie's Pet Adoption Days

FREE PET ADOPTIONS May 31 AND June 1


Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center Joins Maddie’s® Pet Adoption Days

to Empty Our Shelter


Little Shelter Animal Rescue is participating in a gigantic weekend adoption event to place all of our dogs and cats in qualified homes.  Free adoptions will be offered throughout the weekend at the following locations and times:


33 Warner Road

Huntington, NY 11743

631.368.8770 ext 21 

May 31st 12pm-5pm

June 1st 12pm-5pm

More than 200 shelters and rescues in 14 communities throughout the United States are participating in the fifth annual Maddie’s® Pet Adoption Days sponsored by the Pleasanton, CA based Maddie’s Fund®.  Maddie’s Fund has set aside $10 million to provide shelters and rescue groups with an adoption stipend per pet adopted during the event. Stipends range from $500 to $2,000.* 

Maddie’s® Pet Adoption Days is being held to increase awareness of homeless animals, boost adoptions, and support the shelters and rescue organizations in the 14 participating communities.  

The event honors the memory of the foundation’s namesake, a Miniature Schnauzer named Maddie.  Maddie was a little dog who made a big impact on the Duffield family, and they want every homeless dog and cat to have what she had – a loving home.


To learn more about Maddie’s® Pet Adoption days and the participating organizations and locations, visit our website (http://adopt.maddiesfund.org).  We’re also on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram!


* Maddie’s Fund will pay organizations $500 for each  healthy animal under the age of seven, $1,000 for each adoption involving a dog or cat who is seven  years of age or older or who has been treated for one or more treatable medical conditions, and $2,000 for each adoption involving a dog or cat who is seven  years of age or older and who has been treated with one or more treatable medical conditions (list is available at http://adopt.maddiesfund.org).


ABOUT MADDIE’S FUND®

Twenty years ago, the love of a little dog inspired a $300 million legacy to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals. Maddie’s Fund® (www.maddiesfund.org) is the family foundation endowed by the founder of Workday® and PeopleSoft, Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl. It is named in honor of Maddie, their beloved Miniature Schnauzer who passed away in 1997. Today, through its grant giving, hands-on animal care, research and education, Maddie’s Fund is helping to achieve and sustain a no-kill nation by providing solutions to the most challenging issues facing the animal welfare community.

Comment